Monday, January 24, 2011

Alas poor YN-560!

It must have started about a week ago, when I was looking around at a camera store and saw a Yongnuo YN460-RX flash -- Yongnuo's latest flash, with built-in radio manual and radio TTL remote adjustment.  My poor YN560 sensed that I was a little distracted and knew something was going on.  It put two and two together, figured its days were numbered, and formulated a plan.

The YN560 saw its opportunity when we went to the beach this past weekend.  I used the YN560 as an off-camera flash, mounted on a Propet umbrella bracket, firing through a Creative Light translucent umbrella.  For these shots, I waded into the water with our toddler.



As I was taking some photos, the YN560 found a way to loosen itself and dive into the water...!  I looked around in time just to see it splash into the water and fire its last pulse of flash, giving up its soul.  "I served thee well, master, as best as I could," it seemed to say.  "Through the drop tests and open heart surgery, I came through for you ...  I hope you like the images I helped you get and that you'll find happiness with your next flash!"  And that was the last time its Xenon bulb would ever shine again.

I grabbed it without hesitation - stupidly perhaps - getting a little electric shock in the process.  I rushed it back to shore and took out the batteries, which felt extremely hot.  However, even I knew it was too late.  No amount of drying or exchanging batteries would bring the spark back into the little YN560.

Oh, YN560, if you only knew - I had no plans to replace you.  With your ability to sync at extra-high sync speeds without the aid of HSS, and Matrix-style reflexes enabling optical sync at 1/8000 shutter speed, I could always use your photons.  You were content to let the SB-800 grab the headlines, even though it was your rim light that made my shots look a little better. You helped me cheat the shutter's twin razor blades when the mighty SB-800 could not.  Together we broke the CLS code.  You even helped me sell a house and a crib.  And how could I forget that you helped me learn manual flash?  Ah, little YN-560, you worked as hard as the underpaid laborers who made you.  Farewell!